Archive for June, 2011

Vintage Paddleboards on Auction

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

VINTAGE PADDLEBOARDS SURFACE AT HAWAIIAN ISLANDS SURF AUCTION

NollPhoto

Above: Paddleboard Greats Tom Zahn, Greg Noll & Mike Bright pictured in Australia, 1956, at the Olympic demonstration.
Paddleboarding in Hawaii pre-dated the term “waterman” but is an ocean sport that has been key in the athletic pursuits and fitness training of esteemed watermen since the mid-1920s. After the war broke out in 1939, paddleboards made up the majority of boards on Waikiki beach, not just for paddling but also for riding waves standing up.

“Back in those days any hollow board was considered a paddleboard,” says George Downing, one of Hawaii’s best-known paddleboarders as well as a surfer and board maker. “We think of paddleboards for racing, but many of these were for surfing. People actually stood up on them and surfed them like a surfboard. That was the only thing around after the war broke out. Most of the boards on Waikiki beach were paddleboards because the redwood (surfboards) were hard to come by. The redwoods came from California and when the war broke out shipping of redwoods stopped.

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/24572681[/vimeo]

“The racing boards were really long and narrow. The hollow boards that people used for surfing were shorter, maybe 12 or 14 feet in length. There were a lot of hollow wood boards and Pacific Homes wood boards in the ’40s. Fibreglass/resin boards didn’t come about until 1948.”

Up for auction is a gorgeous Pacific Systems Homes “Waikiki” model paddleboard from the late 30’s, in all original condition, like those Downing talks of (below). A hollow wood board made of mahogany and spruce, this one is 14’3″ long, 20 inches wide with a dramatic pintail, and a natural wood and varnish finish.
PacificSystemsHomesPaddleboard
First known as manufacturers of quality tract homes in America prior to World War II, Pacific Systems Homes dove into surfboard and paddleboard production to keep the company afloat during the war. Their pre-war models bore a logo that looked remarkably similar to the swastika but these were soon phased out and replaced with the ‘Waikiki’ model. Pacific Systems Homes boards were known for their superb quality and wood work and were the pride of many Waikiki Beachboys back in the day. The excellent condition of this board gives it a pre-auction estimate of $10,000-$15,000.

Next up, a pair of “Surf King” paddleboards (below). Never heard of them? That’s because they were the limited production of a fine cabinet woodworker in Hoquiam, Washington State, circa late 1940s. Being sold as a “his and hers” pair, these two Surf King boards were found in a barn in Washington and are desirable because of their obscurity. Coming in at 11’11”, of hollow marine plywood construction with marine paint finish, these paddleboards were of the surfing variety. Pre-auction estimate: $5,000-$7,000.
SurfKingPaddleboards

Finally, the cream of the paddleboard offering is a one that originally belonged to Greg ‘Da Bull’ Noll that he paddled in the 1956 Olympic demonstrations in Melbourne, Australia (pictured at top). This board is 17’6″ and super light – a hollow board with fiberglass “skin”. Interestingly, it was also made with knee-wells for knee-paddling. Still in super clean condition, the pre-auction estimate on this board is $15,000-$20,000 and includes this highly collectible 20″x26″ photo that is signed by Noll and fellow paddler Mike Bright.
HAWAIIAN ISLANDS VINTAGE SURF AUCTION SCHEDULE:

Friday July 1: Release of full auction catalog at www.hawaiiansurfauction.com

Friday July 22: Viewing from 12 noon – 6pm, Galleria Hall. Free Antiques Roadshow-style appraisals for the public.  Bring in your favorite piece and see if you own something of value!

Saturday July 23: Doors open for viewing at 10am, Galleria Hall. Silent auction 12noon-3:00pm. Main Auction 4-7pm, Pikake Room. Free viewing. Bidders must have a bidding number.

 

A portion of all auction sales will go to the Outrigger Duke Kahanamoku Foundation Scholarship Fund, and to the Surfing Heritage Foundation. For those unable to attend in person, the auction will be broadcast live on the internet with internet bidding in real time.

 

For More Information, Contact:

Randy Rarick or Jodi Wilmott

Aloha!

HIVSA2011

Giles Interview – Island to Island Waterman Relay

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Paddleathlete.com’s Brian Szymanski interviewed Giles Finlayson race director of the Island to Island Waterman Relay. A grueling 32 mile paddleboard, OC1 and SUP relay event running on October 8, 2011. (visit Islandtoislandwatermanrelay.com for more)

Rob Rojas and Kyle Mochizuki 24 Hour Charity Paddle

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011

It’s 10:00 PM on the West coast, and most of us are finishing up our day. Picking sand out of various crevices, tucking in the kids, and getting ourselves ready for bed. But while we sleep, and when we wake up, Rob Rojas and Kyle Mochizuki will still be paddling. They are supporting Love 146.Org, an organization that serves to combat child sex trafficking around the globe. The goal is to raise awareness and or money to support the cause. Go to www.Love 146.org/tot for more info. If you’d like to donate you can type in ‘Rob Rojas’ for a link to the page.

Special thanks to Rob for organizing this and for standing up for something he believes in. Cheers pal!

You guys are going to be really sick of that island…

 

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WPA National Race – Recap by Connor Baxter

Friday, June 24th, 2011

WPA National Race – by Connor Baxter:

The 2011 Wet feet WPA National Race was a super fun event. I flew over to Oahu from Maui on Friday and the event was on Saturday. The WPA – World Paddle Association – has a series of qualifying events for the Hennessey’s World Event in San Diego in September. An event I definitely want to compete in.

The morning of the race there was no wind, so I was pretty bummed. But the race started at 12:00pm, so there was some time for the wind to pick up. And, sure enough around 11:45am the wind started to blow about 10-12 mph. And once we were all on the start line there was good wind.

The race was on the North Shore from Sunset Beach to Haleiwa, which is about 7miles. There were 105 competitors – 90 were Stand Up Paddlers and there were 15 Prone Paddlers. Once the race started Scott Gamble and I took off and were in the lead. There were good bumps until we got to Waimea – where the wind turned off and the little wind we had was slightly offshore.

When there was still about 5 miles left, Scott pulled a huge gap on me, because I was a little too far outside – and hence he took the lead. So all I was thinking was “anything can happen”. I waited until I saw a good opportunity and I paddled like crazy and made up some ground on him – but I didn’t catch up. Then I did the same thing again – and finally caught up to him and I started to pull away from him.

As I got closer to the finish, the third place guy, Kaeo Abbey caught up to Scott and was right behind me and was starting to catch up. As we rounded the point, Kaeo caught a wave and was right next to me so for the last little bit it was a full sprint to the beach. So I put my head down and gripped my paddle tight and ended up winning – and am now qualified for the World Event. Super stoked.

The top six places are:
1 – CONNOR BAXTER 1:03:08
2 – KAEO ABBEY 1:03:17
3 – SCOTT GAMBLE 1:04:12
4 – JOEY NAPOLEAN 1:06:40
5 – ROBERT STEHLIK 1:07:54
6 – KAINOA BEAUPRE 1:08:37

I want to thank my sponsors for all their support – Starboard, Nike 6.0, Maui Jim Sunglasses, Dakine, EFX Technology, GoPro Cameras, On It Pro, Waterman’s Sunscreen, Sunrite Maui, SIC and Hi-Tech Sports.

Also a big Mahalo to all the event organizers and volunteers. It was a good fun event!!

Video – Molokai to Oahu Paddleboard Race 2011

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmzaU5UtN7g&feature=fvsr[/youtube]
The 15th Annual Molokai 2 Oahu Paddleboard Race will take place on Sunday July 31st.
[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/25407233[/vimeo]

2011 Molokai World Championships SUP and Paddleboard race results

Rock2Rock Results and Rundown

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

by Casey Annis

 

Conditions looked sketchy on Fri-Sat. with a pretty mixed up, bumpy looking channel—very reminiscent of last year’s conditions! But Sunday morning—as predicted—the wind laid down—and while overcast and drizzly, things looked pretty calm.

 

As always, the event (organized by George Loren, his family, and Theresa on the island) was super-well organized and at 6:30 the horn blasted and we were off. The first few miles outside of Two Harbors were kind of bumpy and confused as the prevailing NW, S and SW swell, wrapped around the island and collided, but by about mile 5-7 the swell got better organized and there was actually some pretty decent runners to be had. I was surprised several times when I managed to catch runners on my stock board where I was topping out at 7.5-mph!

 

Like previous years, after about 4-5 miles paddlers scattered all over the place taking any number of super-mysto courses to try and take advantage of either the swell, a direct rum line for Cabrillo or some secret Shokra energy field that flows through the earth and spills forth somewhere in the channel. I could see support boats as much as a half-a-mile to my right and to my left, at times.

 

By about mile 16, the current shifted and wasn’t quite as helpful, but now a number of us had an interesting quandry. An empty car transporter had left the port and was now steaming north, perpendicular to our path to Cabrillo. There was a number of us who had to answer the age-old, Dirty Harry question, “Well punk, are you feeling lucky today?” At first I thought I might make it in front, but then the ship either sped up or realty set-in, because it soon became clear I’d be going around the back. Though in reality, it didn’t really affect my course or time at all. Gary Tomlin was apparently one of the last paddlers to make it in front of the ship and I’ve attached an artsy photo shot by his wife Roni, to give you a sense of the perspective.

 

With just 5 miles to go, the current turned to run down the peninsula so there was really no help to be had from the ocean, though thankfully the wind was still flat so at least we didn’t have that to contend with.

 

Coming in to Cabrillo was the usual dilemma of wanting to go straight in and not paddle a foot more than required, balanced against the reality that the kelp was about as thick, and extending about as far south down the beach, as I’ve seen it in 2-3 years! So around the kelp it was to finish—thankfully—in flat surf-less conditions. Not sure I could have taken one of my signature yard sales at that point.

 

In a new twist this year with the Cabrillo finish, we had to run up the beach into a finish chute, which had to have been to provide light-hearted entertainment for the spectators as half dead paddlers tried to coax their legs into running after 22.5-miles on the board. It was like a scene from “Zombie Paddlers Attack Cabrillo.”

 

Finishing at Cabrillo was a super improvement on an already great event. Family was there to greet everyone, it was easy for crew to attend the post-race festivities, easy to get your stuff off the boats and nice to have your car and gear so close to hand. Between that and probably the most favorable conditions the event’s had in years, this was a fantastic event, with some record times. Results and a few pics are attached below.

 

All the best,

 

Casey

 

Casey is an avid paddler and publisher/editor of several magazines including Vintage Racecar Journal, Alfa Onwer, The Oily Rag and The Vantage Point (Aston Martin)

 

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Dan Gavere and Friends – Colorado High Water Epic SUP Surf

Saturday, June 18th, 2011

Dan Gavere gives highlights on SUP surfing standing waves during a 15 year high water event on the Colorado River at spring run off. A group of surfers hit up the amazing surfing waves at the Glenwood Springs water park and Big Sur wave near Grand Junction.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBKvbrAjawQ[/youtube]
Starboard SUP Dan GavereWerner Paddles Dan GavereThe LIFTSUP handle

Watermans Connor Baxter wins Wet Feet WPA National Race

Friday, June 17th, 2011

WPA National Race – by Connor Baxter:

The 2011 Wet Feet WPA National Race was a super fun event. I flew over to Oahu from Maui on Friday and the event was on Saturday. The WPA – World Paddle Association – has a series of qualifying events for the Hennessey’s World Event in San Diego in September. An event I definitely want to compete in.

The morning of the race there was no wind, so I was pretty bummed. But the race started at 12:00pm, so there was some time for the wind to pick up. And, sure enough around 11:45am the wind started to blow about 10-12 mph. And once we were all on the start line there was good wind.

The race was on the North Shore from Sunset Beach to Haleiwa, which is about 7miles. There were 105 competitors – 90 were Stand Up Paddlers and there were 15 Prone Paddlers. Once the race started Scott Gamble and I took off and were in the lead. There were good bumps until we got to Waimea – where the wind turned off and the little wind we had was slightly offshore.

When there was still about 5 miles left, Scott pulled a huge gap on me, because I was a little too far outside – and hence he took the lead. So all I was thinking was “anything can happen”. I waited until I saw a good opportunity and I paddled like crazy and made up some ground on him – but I didn’t catch up. Then I did the same thing again – and finally caught up to him and I started to pull away from him.

As I got closer to the finish, the third place guy, Kaeo Abbey caught up to Scott and was right behind me and was starting to catch up. As we rounded the point, Kaeo caught a wave and was right next to me so for the last little bit it was a full sprint to the beach. So I put my head down and gripped my paddle tight and ended up winning – and am now qualified for the World Event. Super stoked.

The top six places are:
1 – CONNOR BAXTER 1:03:08
2 – KAEO ABBEY 1:03:17
3 – SCOTT GAMBLE 1:04:12
4 – JOEY NAPOLEAN 1:06:40
5 – ROBERT STEHLIK 1:07:54
6 – KAINOA BEAUPRE 1:08:37

I want to thank my sponsors for all their support – Starboard, Nike 6.0, Maui Jim Sunglasses, Dakine, EFX Technology, GoPro Cameras, On It Pro, Waterman’s Sunscreen, Sunrite Maui, SIC and Hi-Tech Sports.

Also a big Mahalo to all the event organizers and volunteers. It was a good fun event!!

Aloha –
Connor Baxter

Photos Courtesy of Wet Feet Hawaii:

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Man and His Craft: Mitch Kahn

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011


Mention the name Mitch Kahn around a bunch of lifeguards, and they all get weak in the knees. In the tight knit guarding community, Mitch is a legend. While guarding, Mitch won 45 individual open titles in the US Lifeguard Championships; the most by anyone ever. Mitch was also captain of the 1992 US Olympic kayak team. But Mitch is, and always has been in the business of saving lives. Since his many years of service as a lifeguard, Mitch has moved on to become a firefighter and a paramedic.
Mitch is one of those people who is annoyingly good at everything he does, and at age 50 he can still be found making easy work of the youngsters. The fact of the matter is that through all his years of saving lives, Mitch has remained one of the nicest, most humble watermen that you will ever meet.

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Ride Everything by Len Barrow

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

I have had the wonderful opportunity to ride every type of surf craft in my 41 years on this planet. I regard myself a lucky man. I learned something new on each design of surfboard both technique wise and culturally. All of these boards contributed to my happiness as a surfer today and I thought that writing about my experiences with them could be both fun and illuminating.
The Knee-Board
Most people don’t even know that these things exist. The knee boarder is a dying race. The individuals who still knee board on Oahu full time can be counted on one hand. They are a breed apart. Knee boarders strike me as pure surfers committed to pure surfing…..getting barelled. I should know, I was one.
Being a knee boarder (like a body board) can be kind of hard socially. As you don’t stand some surfers regard you as a lesser being. I have been called a “half man” or “the man that took a main round to the stomach”. People will often drop in on us and my friends still give me grief when I pull the old kneeboard out.
Despite this knee boarding taught me a lot about surfing. As you are kneeling, your face is almost touching the wave. It is a very intimate type of surfing to do. You are so close to the wave that you really feel it’s every movement. The bonus to being both low is that you can get insane barrels on almost any bowling wave. Turns on a kneeboard are a blast also. You learn how to use your arms as a pivot point (fulcrum) and as you swoop around, your face is literally inches from the wave, just like a bird. Great Fun!
The Body-Board
The humble body board is a gem. Socially, body boarders get the most flack. They have wrongly been called Spongers, Speed Bumps, Dick Draggers, Cripples, Launch Pads and other derogatory names that I will not mention here. There is even a sticker that says “Friends don’t let Friends Body board”. To me, this is all wrong! My fondest memories were on a body board. In fact my surfing addiction started on a body board. I was a child on the island of Kauai and my brother and I shared a body board at a beach break. I will always remember my first wave. I kicked in and the wave lifted me and sped myself strait toward the beach. At first I was in shock. This turned to awe, then elation and I laughed my head off all the way to the sand. I remember thinking “I like this…I wanna do this forever”. My normal life was all over, due to a bodyboard. Sorry Mother, you should have not purchased that first bodyboard for us (my brother is a surf addict also)..haha.
If you think body boarders are kooks, you should see what they are doing at Pipeline. Body boarders routinely take off deeper than any surfer, and do aerial maneuvers that short boarders are only dreaming off. The body boarder can pull of full 720 degree (two rotation aerials) in the sky. Think about that if you believe you kill it!
The Short Board
Yes, we now come to the ultra-hip short board. “Only real surfers ride shortboads was my mantra”. I was a shortboarder for 17 years and I still bust out the 5’11 occasionally when the kids get a little uppity. I did the whole short board competition thing and had the attitude of an 18 year old ripper (at least I thought I was one in my head). But how fun it was.
I may be biased but you can’t call yourself core unless you were a short-board shredder in the eighties (just kidding). We thought we were soo cool. I went to Roosevelt High school in Hawaii. We would show up to school in ultra-tight girls cut board shorts which revealed certain anatomical features of the male. Why girls cut board short you may ask? They were the men’s style of the time! We would also wear Pink Quicksilver jackets on top of these tight shorts. To top off the ensemble, checkerboard vans would be added with a Flock of Seagull Haircut. We were walking peacocks and the girls loved it! Bring back the Eighties!
The short board is tremendously fun and difficult. People have it easy today as they start on longboards or even SUPs. I had to start on a 5’11 and it took me a full month to stand up.
I am very happy to have what surfers call a short board background. The short board teaches a surfer many things. Balance is one of them. As this type of board is both narrow and short it is inherently unstable. Yet with practice this instability turns in to maneuverability. Short boards are amazingly fun. Your turning arc can be one quarter the length of longboard and you can fit into the critical section of the wave routinely.
I suppose that the most important thing that I learned from the short board was pocket surfing. With this type of board you must surf close to the curl, otherwise known as the pocket. If you get too far out on the shoulder the board loses momentum and you may fade out of the wave. If I did not have this short board background, I can almost guarantee that I would not have achieved a US championship on a longboard.

Continued…

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EVENT – Surftech RSP3 (formerly the Surf Monkey)

Monday, June 13th, 2011

s a collection of events that has something for every endurance sport enthusiast.June 01, 2011 (Oceanside, CA) – Multisports Events, a division of Multisports.com, announces the Surftech RSP3 (formerly the Surf Monkey), a swim, run, paddle experience for the whole family that will take place at the Oceanside Pier on Sunday, July 17th, 2011.

Event Schedule:
7:00am – 1-mile Open Water Swim around Oceanside Pier
8:00am – 5km Run/Walk
9:00am – 3-mile & 6-mile SUP/Paddleboard Race (WPA Sanctioned)
9:20am – 1-mile Run/Walk – Open Women
9:40am – 1-mile Run/Walk – Open Men
10:00am – 1-mile Run/Walk – Kids

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpQNcrqMuBw#at=64[/youtube]

“We’re proud to partner with our new title sponsor, Surftech, to bring the RSP3 – Run, Swim, Paddle, Presented by Roadrunner Sports and Clif Bar. Formerly known as the Surf Monkey, the Surftech RSP3 is a great mix of endurance sports that brings athletes from many disciplines to the Oceanside Pier for a day of great competition & fun. The event also includes a Sports and Fitness Expo featuring Live Music and great food. For multisport athletes who want to ride their bicycles to the event, there will be a secure bike valet where bicycles can be stored while the participant is racing.

This family oriented day of racing is comprised of 1-mile open water swim around the Oceanside Pier, a 5km FLAT AND FAST RUN/WALK on the OCEANSIDE STRAND, a 3 & 6-mile paddleboard / SUP race, and a 1-Mile RUN/WALK – including a KID’s event. Stand Up Paddle Demo boards will be available throughout the day and, to add a little more excitement to the day, the race hosts are adding an Elite SUP Surf Race around the Pier.

Race Director Paul Huddle explains; “There is something for everyone. Every member of the family can compete in one of the three events and no one needs to feel left out. When not racing, you can enjoy the Expo & live music instead of rushing home because you feel guilty. Hardcore competitors have the option of doing 2 or all 3 events with a chance to win the most coveted trophy in sport: the Surf Monkey.

The City of Oceanside offers a beautiful backdrop and great weather for running, swimming, and paddling and the Pier offers the perfect venue for this unique competition. “Our goal as event organizers is to create a community celebration of the healthy, athletic Lifestyle we enjoy as residents of North County San Diego.” said Swim/Paddle Course Director Dan Van Dyck.

This year the expo will be featuring live music from the home town band, Tower Seven. “You definitely want to bring the family and spend the whole day at the beach. We’ve got great food, entertainment, a jumpy for the kids, and the best beach in North County. The expo festivities are free to the public.” said Roch Frey, partner at Multisports.com.

For more information and registration, go to http://www.RSP3Race.com

Paddlers Brave Challenging Conditions to Support SurfAid

Friday, June 10th, 2011

Paddlers Brave Challenging Conditions to Support SurfAid at Watermans Paddle for Humanity Deefield Beach.

 

Deerfield Beach, Florida – Over a hundred spectators and paddlers came out last Saturday for the Watermans Applied Science Paddle for Humanity in Deerfield Beach.  The event was the second stop in the 2011 series which kicked off April 30th in Dana Point and will culminate in Washington DC on August 20th.  Despite high winds and difficult conditions the event was an overwhelming success.

 

Challenging conditions forced a last minute route change, moving the fun paddle and start of the Elite race to the Inter Coastal Waterway.  However, even two to three foot chop, twenty knot winds and a daring dash out the Boca Raton Inlet didn’t stop over fifty of Florida’s best paddlers from taking on the Elite course.  At the finish it was Gary Wise of Miramar Beach Florida who conquered the conditions and took the overall win with a time of 1:05:56 on his one-man outrigger followed closely by Chase Kosterlitz of St. Pete Beach on his 14’ standup paddleboard.  The sounds of Polynesian drums, conch horns and hula dancers at the finish made this truly a unique event.

In the end it is all about the community.  This is the first year the Paddle for Humanity has been expanded to include events on both coasts, making it unique in the sport.  “[Everyone involved] was blown away by how supportive and committed the paddling community in Florida was to making this event a success,” said race director and co-owner of Watermans Applied Science Pete Stirling. “It says a lot about the tremendous growth of paddling as a sport and the community that supports it to be able to hold a series like this on a national level.  I think the Paddle for Humanity is a great way to channel all that energy to benefit a great cause like SurfAid.”  Stirling is enthusiastic about putting on the event again next year.

The Paddle for Humanity features a unique fundraising platform that encourages participants to raise money for SurfAid.  “The event has been so successful over the past two years and it is a huge honor to watch the paddling and surfing community come together for a cause,” said Randal Schober, Executive Director at SurfAid International. “We are very grateful to Watermans’ for their continued support and for their efforts in connecting the paddling community to SurfAid.”

Please support our Deerfield Beach sponsors:  Kona Brewing Company, Oceans 234, Precision Paddleboards, Ark Paddleboards, Yolo Paddleboards, Sports Authority, Oakley, H20 Audio, The Wyndham Resorts and Polynesian Proud Productions.

 

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About SurfAid International

The mission of SurfAid International, a non-profit humanitarian organization, is to improve the health, wellbeing and self-reliance of people living in isolated regions connected to us through surfing.  For more information or to make a donation contact the SurfAid staff at 760.931.1199, visit www.surfaidinternational.org or e-mail usa@surfaidinternational.org

 

About Watermans:  Applied Science

WATERMANS Applied Science is dedicated to providing today’s Watermen and women with the best, most effective and functional, high-performance sunscreen on the market. Made and Manufactured in California, USA. Visit www.watermanssunscreen.com to learn more.

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BAY 2 BAY ROWING AND PADDLING REGATTA

Friday, June 10th, 2011

The Bay to Bay race on May 11.

Peninsula Family YMCA presents the 28th Annual Rowing & Paddling Regatta. The regatta includes a 20 mile race which begins at Santa Clara Point in Mission Bay and a 5 mile race which begins at Shelter Island. All races finish at Tidelands Park in Coronado. The regatta is open to all human powered watercraft: Outriggers, Kayaks, Surf Skis,
Rowers, Paddle Boards, SUP’s, etc.

Race Start Times

Download PDF

 

How to surf on a SUP

Friday, June 10th, 2011

The best advices to surf your first waves on a SUP

NOAH Kalama Outrigger Classic Races: SUP | OC1 | OC6

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

Noah Kalama Outrigger Classic Races Include:

SUP

Men’s Individual Race (3 miles) – Cash Award
Women’s Individual Race (3 miles) – Cash Award
Open Team Relay Race – 4 per team
Novice Team Relay Race – 4 per team

OC1

Sprints for All Age Groups

OC6

Keikis Sprints
Novice Sprints
Novice Mini Iron Race (3 miles)
Open Iron Race Dash for Cash (15 mile Cabrillo Run) – Cash Awards
Masters Iron Race Dash for Cash (15 mile Cabrillo Run) – Cash Awards

Eventbrite http://noah.eventbrite.com

 

2011 Loop Race Results

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

the Loop race 2011Dear Loopers,
Thanks for coming down for the race! The weather today (Monday) is horrible and I feel like we dodged a bullet with the conditions yesterday.

I really like seeing everyone at the race. I hope everyone that gave The Loop a shot thisyear were able to enjoy the spirit of the event despite my inability to accommodate theSUP divisions. Trust me SUPr’s, ask the 14’ paddleboard division how long it took forus to get THAT divisions some recognition!
Finish times matter, as do what place you got… no doubt. But, the real stoke for doingsomething like a paddleboard race comes from reflecting on doing something difficult. Itwould be easier to shine it. You can buy cars that park themselves, and wash a week’sworth of dirty dishes with the push of a button. So, when you pull something off like along paddle, you are able to tap into and satisfy an internal hard wire within all of us that provides true satisfaction so often missed these days.

I’d like to especially thank Jake, at Ocean Minded, for all that he does for the race. Hemakes us legit with what he provides… all for the same size logo on the shirt as the othersponsors (who were killer too… don’t start reading into this too much!).

So, thanks again, Jake.
Until next year!
Dan Mann

View Race Results

 

Is lighter really faster? SUP weight experiment- by Robert Stehlik

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

This entry is kind of off topic for the Zen Waterman blog as it is a technical description of an experiment I conducted, although it does tie into paying attention and being focused.  If you are interested in the interplay of weight and acceleration/ speed/ momentum on stand up paddle boards you might find it interesting.

I was inspired to test the effect of weight on speed in Stand Up Paddle boards when I was reading a discussions on the Stand Up Zone forum titled “Heavier Boards Faster?”.
You may want to read it to understand the discussion that let to this experiment.  I will use some of the things I wrote in the discussion and will try to add details and information here that were not covered in the forum discussion.

The setup:
The short video clip above is a test of the GoPro camera and shows the set up used for the test.
Board: 12’6″ x 29 1/2″ Amundson Touring/race board.  For more information on this board, please check out the Aquaglide brochure.  I chose this board because it is stable enough to handle 30 extra pounds without making it difficult to balance. It has 247 liters of volume, so it can float up to 247 kilos= 544 pounds.  It weighs just over 30 lbs, so adding 30 lbs roughly doubles the weight and should make a measurable difference in speed.  I was concerned that using less weight would make the speed difference too small to be significant and measurable.
In the video: GPS and Go Pro cam taped to board: to record the speed on the GPS with the camera to see how the weight affects acceleration/ deceleration and top speed.

The 12’6 Amundson has a sealed insert on the deck. I screwed in an old windsurfing unversal and used it to tie off the weights so I could not lose them.

My weight is just under 200 pounds, the board itself weighs just over 30 lbs, I added 30 pounds on the deck for testing.  Although the board weight is doubled by adding 30 pounds, if you consider the weight of the rider + board, the weight difference is 230 lbs vs. 260 lbs with the extra weight, or just 13% more, and I’m assuming results would be different with different rider weights.

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