Posts Tagged ‘Molokai to Oahu’

Molokai 2 Oahu 2013 Paddleboard Race

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

Raw video from the 2013 Molokai 2 Oahu for news media. Non-corrected, unedited footage

Mick Di Betta at the Molokai2Oahu 2013

Thursday, August 1st, 2013

“It’s never over, if you don’t let it ”  – hopefully we’ll see you again next year Mick!

Molokai2Oahu Update – M20 Registration Opens March 15

Thursday, March 14th, 2013

Molokai 2 Oahu Paddleboard World Championships

Registration for the 17th annual Molokai-2-Oahu Paddleboard World Championships (M2O), presented by Kona Longboard Island Lager, opens Friday March 15th at 12:00 PST. The event, scheduled for July 28th will draw an international field of paddlers and, as in previous years, sell out far in advance of the July 1st registration deadline. Register at www.molokai2oahu.com.

M2O is much more than a championship race. It is a 32-mile journey from Molokai to Oahu across the Ka’iwi Channel – one of the deepest, most treacherous channels in the world. The ever-changing conditions of this channel requires both athletic ability and navigation skills – a true championship test. M2O is the iconic event in the paddling community and has become the milestone for those seeking to define themselves as watermen. Like other iconic endurance events M2O is a deeply personal experience and defines a champion in every sense of the word.

The images and stories from the M2O race fuel the minds of paddlers across the globe driving the passion that propelled paddling as the largest growth segment in action sports today. M2O is infused with the culture of Hawaii and its people and all who attend will feel the enigmatic spirit of Aloha.

For further information on the race, race registration, rules and requirements go to www.molokai2oahu.com

Video – Soul Surf Media + Molokai 2011

Monday, September 12th, 2011

The 15th annual Molokai to Oahu World Championship Paddle Board Race took place on July 31, 2011. It was a record breaking year in attendance and about every course record fell as the “channel of bones” seemed in a good mood giving competitors good conditions across the 32 miles of open ocean. In this first of our video series from the race, we just get a little glimpse of the race and some of the people who made the channel crossing this year.

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/28910110[/vimeo]

Chris Aguilar and Soul Surf Media are the producers and director behind the first stand up paddle feature film, Destination 3 Degrees that was screened at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival

Connor Baxter Race Recap – Molokai 2011

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

Images: Karen Baxter

The Molokai-2-Oahu Race as Jamie Mitchell states, “If you love paddling, this is the race of all races – it’s our Superbowl. I love the feeling of apprehension, the nerves and waiting to see what the ocean’s going to deliver. The depth of talent in this year’s race is unsurpassed.”

Well – the event for me started on Thursday. My dad, mom and I were to take our boat from Maui to Molokai on Friday, relax on Saturday, Race on Sunday. So preparations started on Thursday getting the boat provisioned and equipped.

Around 3:00pm my dad called me and asked me to pick up a guy named “Mike” at the airport. He was going to go on our boat for support. I asked what he looked like, what his cell number was – and my dad told me I did not know him – but he knew me. His cell phone was dead – but he would be holding a paddle.

I got to the airport – and what a “SURPRISE”!!! There was no “Mike” – My sister Ashley had flown in from California – to be with us for the weekend. She walked up to the car – and I was speechless. She and my dad had planned this Surprise – and WOW – what an OUTRAGEOUS Surprise!!

So – already the Weekend started out fantastic for me – with my sister coming to watch me race.

We all left on Friday morning from Kahului Harbor and headed over to the west side of Molokai. We stopped in Kaunakakai on the south side of Molokai to grab my race board that we left with our friend Greg Jenkins after the Triple Crown Event. Finally arriving at Kaluakoi Beach around 4:00pm, we swam in and walked to our condo settling in before dinner.

Saturday was a day to take it easy, focus on the upcoming race and what I had to do to win. That night the event had organized a dinner for us, then I went and had a second dinner at the Maui Jim get together and then it was straight to bed from there.

The next day we had to wake up at 5:00 in the morning to get down to the beach and get ready. Right before the race we had a Pule (Hawaiian Prayer) and then off to the water for the start of a long day. I was really stoked with the start – cause the Solo SUP’s got to start with all the Solo prone paddlers, which was cool because I got to paddle next to Jamie Mitchell for a bit.

When the horn blew I knew what I had to do and that is all I was focusing on. There was a little wind right from the start and I was catching some little bumps, which is always nice. I knew my biggest competition would be Dave Kalama, Scott Gamble and Livio Menelau. And, sure enough – the four of us were out in front quickly.

After about an hour Scott Gamble and I had taken the lead – and we were together right until the end. Pushing each other – never letting up. As we got more and more into the channel the swells got bigger and I started to get better and better glides. I had a steady pace going that was keeping me in the front of the pack. The farther I got into the channel it got harder and harder. I was getting more tired and the current was getting stronger going against me. But, I kept it going as hard as I could until the end.

One thing that really helped was having my family on the boat cheering for me to keep me going. Hearing them cheer was like drinking some energy drink – it just gave a huge boast to paddle harder.

When I was about 10 miles off of Oahu it felt like I wasn’t moving and it didn’t look like I was getting closer to the island at all. The current in the channel is swift – and runs north hampering the downwind headway. As Dave Kalama wrote “Most of this race really is fun…, but when you get close to Oahu the fun stops and the reality of how hard it really is starts to set in. For some reason Mother Nature decided to put one of her most wicked currents in front of Oahu acting like a night club bouncer protecting the door.”

Keeping an eye on Scott – I noticed we were dead even except he was more north than I was. This positioning made a big difference. And, I was exactly where I needed and wanted to be.

When we turned down to head to Coco Head, I was closer than him because he was more upwind (North) of me. This gave me a good gap on him, which would be really hard for him to make up.

Making it to the wall and hugging it, getting out of the washing machine, getting around Portlock – I knew what was in store for me. The “Next” hardest part of the race – the end – making it to the finish line.

Once I turned the corner it was $&!#. I had to paddle upwind for about 1½ miles – and the wind was blowing – gusting to about 20mph right in my face. I was already super tired from the 31 mile Crossing – but then to top it off I had this nice treat. I choked up on my paddle, crouched down with my body, put my head down and just kept paddling to the finish. As I got closer and closer I could hear all the people, which made me paddle faster.

Being the first person to the beach Overall was pretty cool because normally Jamie is the first guy to touch the beach. When I crossed the finish I was so dead and ready for a nice cool – you got it – a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup!!

I ended up with a time of 4:26:10. This time beat last years record be almost 30 minutes and beat Jamie’s new record by about 15 minutes. I was really happy with my result and can’t wait for the next challenge.

I want to thank my sponsors for all their support – Starboard, Rainbow Sandals, Maui Jim Sunglasses, EFX Technology, Dakine, Nike 6.0, GoPro Cameras, On It Pro, Waterman’s Sunscreen, Sunrite Maui, SIC Maui and Hi-Tech Sports.

A Special Thanks to Scott Sanchez from MPG for his wisdom as a trainer.

And, to a wonderful, thoughtful, special Sister – Ashley – Thanks for this special “surprise” weekend!!!

Also a big Mahalo to all the event organizers and volunteers.

Aloha –
Connor Baxter

Race results will be found here!

VIDEO – Finish 2011 Molokai World Championships

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

Awesome video of the finish of the Molokai 2011 World Championships

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IplUSz2ACCk[/youtube]
Race results

Race Results | 2011 Molokai Paddleboard and SUP World Championships Race Results

Saturday, July 30th, 2011
Buy a DVD - Dan gavere and Nikki Gregg Supinstruction.com

Race Results | 2011 Molokai2Oahu – Molokai Paddleboard World Championships

Divisions:

Paddleboard – Unlimited Men

1st place: Jamie Mitchell 4:40:31

2nd place: Brad Gaul 4:47:45:90 (faster than Jamie Mitchell’s time from last year!)

Paddleboard – Unlimited Women

1st Place: Jordan Mercer 5:22:31

Paddleboard – Stock Women

Joanna  Bilancieri 6:39:02

 

SUP Unlimited Women

1st place: Andrea Moller 5:26:51

SUP – Unlimited Men

1st Place: Connor Baxter  4:26:10
2nd Place: Scott Gamble

 Paddleboard – Stock

1st place: Eric Abbott 5:26:59

Full results can be found here

Compare them with last years results 

 

Video – Molokai to Oahu Paddleboard Race 2011

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmzaU5UtN7g&feature=fvsr[/youtube]
The 15th Annual Molokai 2 Oahu Paddleboard Race will take place on Sunday July 31st.
[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/25407233[/vimeo]

2011 Molokai World Championships SUP and Paddleboard race results

Video – 2010 Molokai2Oahu Recap

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010
[vimeo]http://www.vimeo.com/17245350[/vimeo]

Video: Ekolu Kalama 2nd in the 2010 Moloka’i to Oahu Paddleboard Race Kaiwi Channel.

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

Ekolu Kalama 2nd place at Molokai in the SUP divisionEkolu Kalama places 2nd in the Stand Up Paddle Division. 2010 Moloka’i to Oahu Paddleboard Race is the most famous channel crossing of the roughest channel in Hawaii, the Kaiwi Channel. excellent footage taken from the chase boat start to finish

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmzaU5UtN7g[/youtube]

Full Version Molokai Video..

Sunday, August 15th, 2010

Here it is guys and gals.. It’s a pretty long Video but Joss tried to capture the whole process of leaving Oahu for Molokai and the stuff that goes on in between and of course the race.. Hope you enjoy it …. Cheers JM

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/14003683[/vimeo]

Matt Friedman heading in towards China wall on Oahu

Friday, August 6th, 2010
Starboard 14' SURF RACE Molokai
Matt Friedman heading in towards China wall on Oahu, riding the Starboard 14′ SURF/RACE with Hawaii rocker designed by Brian Szymanski.
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9vP4339ttJ4[/youtube]

Molokai Teaser…

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010

Well the big one is done and dusted ….. What a great year. A huge amount of Aussie’s invaded the Hawaiian Island Chain this year to take on the Channel. I think we were represented by Queensland , N.S.W and West OZ. Great job everyone.. As they all found out the Channel isn’t a perfect downwind run.. It never has been and never will be. Thats why it is the challenge that it is and why you feel such satisfaction coming across that line.

I was lucky enough to have my Fiance Joss do some filming of the process of doing the channel. She has done a great job and here is a little teaser of what is to come. The full version will be available in the next week.. Well i hope everyone has had a little break and is recovered.. I am on the road at the moment and have just been to Utah and am on my way to New York in a few days then off to Lake Tahoe. A busy few weeks and i’m really looking forward to being back home on the Gold Coast. Thanks for all the support of my Fiance,Family and Friends. Couldnt do it without you guys. Take care JM

Molokai Teaser (www.jamie-mitchell.com) from Jamie Mitchell on Vimeo.

Dave Kalama – Molokai to Oahu

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

What a doozy that race was. Every year I say to myself ” I’m never doing that race again”. How quickly you forget the pain and mental anguish you go through to finish that race. As I described it at the awards party ”this race is like a candy bar with a rock in it. While you’re eating it, it tastes great. Then you get the rock( Oahu ) and ouch.” Most of this race really is fun and there are ample bumps to keep you moving, but when you get close to Oahu the fun stops and the reality of how hard it really is starts to set in. For some reason Mother Nature decided to put one of her most wicked currents in front of Oahu acting like a night club bouncer protecting the door. Only the hardest core of the paddling elite will be let in for the celebration inside. If you do make it past the muscular current protecting the door, you’re met at the corner of Port Lock Point with your next crushing reality. A wall of wind that will test your mental and physical fortitude to the very core. I have a whole new appreciation for the salmon that swim up stream to get to their instinctual breading grounds. Like the salmon it literally feels as though you are fighting tooth and nail for every foot as you get closer to the finish line. There was a point when a gust hit me and I was giving it everything, which wasn’t much because of how tired I was, and according to my escort boat I wasn’t moving forward. You basically try not to go backwards during the gusts and go like hell when they subside to make as much ground as possible before the next one. You are literally 31.3 of the 32 miles there and you start to wonder if you can make it. It really is one of the most cruel things I do to myself on an annual basis, but as long as you just keep pulling the paddle out of the water and keep reaching it forward you eventually make it.  It starts to soothe the pain a little when the rest of your stand up buddies are all describing the same experience.

Misery loves company.
Photo by Daniel Costigan

For me this race had a lot to do with redemption. I had an extremely tough racing season last year with two very big disappointments. First, at last years Naish Maliko race my rudder fell off by the time I got to Hookipa. I probably had a 100yd. lead by that point and thought it was money in the bank. The next thing I know my rudder isn’t reacting to any of my movements so I jump in the water, turn my board over and there’s nothing there. It was like a bad dream, I couldn’t believe it was happening and it took me a good couple seconds to get my mind around it. My first thought was “I’m screwed”, then I thought no, I’m gonna see how many people I can beat without a rudder. Had I actually gone across the finish line at the end I still would have gotten 9th place, but on that day I wasn’t looking for a 9th place finish, I was just trying to salvage some type of moral victory.

Next was last years Molokai to Oahu. I over trained and ended up getting sick. It really was heart breaking because I had put in an absurd amount of training to prepare for that race. I started with a one hour up wind paddle and kept building till I had gotten to the point of doing a five and a half hour up wind paddle. The downwind part only took an hour fifteen. I ended up doing the race anyway but went through a very tough mental experience that I described in detail in the “Inspiration” post.

The night before this year’s race I had the good fortune of having a meal with Jamie Mitchell. Part of the good fortune being that his fiance Joss cooked one of her fantastic pasta dinners, the rest being that we talked about strategy and line stuff. Even though I’ve been across that channel many more times than Jamie, nobody has won as many times as he has so it’s always good to get his take on the line and strategy. He had mentioned that he might go a bit north and as I saw the following day, boy did he ever. Which in the end I think was a factor in my success, because everyone decided to follow him, even the stand up guys. That left a more direct route wide open for me to exploit. Maybe only one or two guys decided to follow me on the A to B tactic, which was great because the whole race I was left alone to race my race and not be distracted by the press boats and the helicopter flying over head. It was just me and my escort boat to run our line.

At about half way my support crew, Loch, his brother Hunter and Nalu, were telling me I had maybe two miles on the rest of the pack, but because I don’t like to look back, I didn’t really believe them and just kept acting like they were right behind me. My cousin Ekolu is such a strong paddler that no lead is big enough to be safe from him, and that’s just what I was thinking almost the whole way. It wasn’t till I got maybe a couple hundred yards from the finish did I actually believe he wasn’t going to catch up. Like I told his mom earlier in the day,” I don’t care which one of us wins, as long as it’s a Kalama”, she agreed and gave me a big smile.

In most of my races that I do or even in training runs I like to create a mantra and then just keep repeating it to myself, in order to help me focus on whatever I feel is important for that day. For this day it was ” every bump matters, use every single bump no matter how small it is”, and ” do whatever it takes to keep the board moving”. Both are very obvious but when you’re fatigued and your wits aren’t as quick as normal, it’s tremendously helpful to already have those stuck in your head like a bad song you can’t stop singing. What they also do is create a point of focus so you don’t wonder off into la-la land, which is really easy to do if you’re by yourself with no competition. Another really important factor is your escort boat. They really can make it or break it for you. I had a great crew in that they were very positive, very supportive and very motivating when I had no competition around me. They kept checking if I needed liquids, which reminds you to hydrate. At one point I started thinking maybe I should back off to conserve energy and as soon as they could see me letting up Loch said ” keep pushing, go for the record!”. Just that little comment totally fired me up again and it was full steam ahead. Most people don’t put much consideration into their escort boats but I’ve learned my lesson, and I can tell you this. If you’re serious, you better start paying attention to who is on the boat because it can make a huge difference. Ali from Australia found out the hard way what a bad boat driver can do to you. The guy bailed on her just before the finish line, she cramped and there was nobody there to help her. Didn’t even get to cross the line. If it were me, in the mental state anyone would be in after that much exertion, I would have snapped. Full postal. But she handled it with tremendous grace and focused on all the positive things she did accomplish. She is much more evolved than I am.

As hard as this race is, and as much as I like to say I’ll never do it again, there is a certain feeling of accomplishment that comes with just doing this crossing. Whether you’re first or two hundred and first it really doesn’t matter–the race is against the channel. You can see the glow on every participants face that says” I did it”. So simple yet so profound. Because behind that glow of exhaustion, is all the miles of preparation, the days of work to buy the airline tickets, the phone calls to organize your escort, organizing your equipment, the anticipation, making sure you have enough to drink, the hours working on your technique, the sacrifice of being away from friends and family and all the hundreds of other details that must be tended to. You earn that glow, it can’t be fabricated. It only comes from the finishing of that monumental task, and finishing position has nothing to do with. Everyone that does it gets the glow whether they want it or not. When you look a fellow paddler in the eye, you see it, and you smile knowing words can never describe what you both share.

I hope to see you out there next year. I think.

Aloha,

Dave

Visit Dave’s site: A Waterman’s Journal: Dave Kalama

Connor Baxter’s Story of Paddling the Molokai to Oahu Stand Up Paddleboard Race

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

Connor Baxter claims 1st place in SOLO Stand Up Paddleboard Marathon Men’s 29 and under. Zane Schweitzer finished 3rd. This win took place only weeks after his 1st place win at the Mormaii 27 Mile Express. We gave you the lowdown on Connor’s winning paddleboard marathon strategy last week.

Here is the 15 year old pro rider Connor Baxter’s story;

Molokai to Oahu – 32 mile Crossing across the Ka’iwi Channel. Before this race I felt so prepared because that week I ate super good, drank lots of water and rested. My mom and I went over to Molokai Friday night on the Ferry to Kaunakakai.

Then headed over to the west side and stayed at the condos right where the event was. I slept in on Saturday and then went for a swim – I basically had a super relaxing day. Around 5:00 the stand up paddle board race meeting started and then I had a huge dinner and went back to the room – and went right to bed to get a good night sleep.

When I woke up I had oatmeal and put on my headphones and blasted some music to get pumped up. We had the blessing at 6:30am and then it was hurry up and get all the gear to the boat and get out to the start line. The lay down paddlers went first at 7:30am and now my heart is racing. I paddled over to the start line and I knew what I had to do. We started at 8:00am and we were off to a fast pace.

The conditions were super good – the winds were up and there were good swells. In the beginning, it was more flat water so the stronger guys with muscles took off.

But once we got into the swells I started to catch up to Livio Menelau and Ekolu Kalama. Dave Kalama and Scott Gamble went south so I did not see much of them. I finally caught and passed Livio, but I just could not catch up to Ekolu. So I put my head down and paddled my hardest. When I looked up about 45 min later I had closed the gap and was right behide Ekolu but once he noticed I was right by him he turned on his after burners and just took off on his paddleboard.

So now I was in 2nd place so I just kept paddling. When I looked over to my left (south), I noticed another stand up paddler and it was Scott Gamble. He was coming from the south and I was now trying to pick up my pace to stay up with him. He was super far to the south so I thought I still had a chance, but his course was a lot better and he pulled into 2nd and put me in third.

When I finally rounded the outside point to come into the harbor, my jaw drop to the paddleboard because the wind was blowing about 10 knots offshore and I had to paddle 2 more miles into it.

It’s like running a 32 mile marathon and putting the last 2 miles up a steep hill.

When the tip of my paddleboard finally crossed the finish line and got into shore, I was so happy because I made it and got third place. BUT, then someone told me that Dave Kalama was already in and he got 1st place, not Ekolu. Dave was so far in front that I did not even see him (I don’t think anyone did!!). So at the end I got 4th overall for Solo Stand Up Paddling and I got 7th overall out of all the lay down paddlers and SUP paddlers, both team and solo. So I am super stoked on my results and hope to do better next time.

Connor Baxter’s Finish Time 5:12:43

1st Place SOLO SUP Men’s 29 and under
4th Place Overall SOLO SUP
7th Place Overall SUP, Paddleboards, Solo and Team – out of 139 Entries
SUP Results:
1st = Dave Kalama  4:54:15
2nd = Ekolu Kalama  5:03:13
3rd = Scott Gamble   5:06:15
4th = Connor Baxter  5:12:43

I want to thank all my sponsors for their help and support – Starboard Paddleboards, Nike 6.0, SIC, Dakine, Sunrite Maui, Waterman’s Sunscreen, and Ion Wetsuits. Also, my newest sponsors Kaenon Sunglasses and EFX Performance USA!!!

Also, a BIG Mahalo to Mark Raaphorst, Livio Menelau, Scott Trudon, Bart de Schwart for all the time and support they have devoted to training with me!!!!!!!!!  Also, Scott Sanchez (MPG) for his wisdom on fitness and training!!


Aloha –

Connor Baxter

http://connorbaxter.com

Photos:  Karen Baxter

molokai-oahu-connor-baxter

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Huge Accomplishment for Connor Baxter at 15 – 4th place finish at Molokai!

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

Connor Baxter Molokai 2 Oahu

Karen Baxter is a very proud Mom! Way to go Connor Baxter!

Molokai to Oahu  27 July, 2010 32 mile Crossing across the Ka’iwi Channel. Before this race I felt so prepared because that week I ate super good, drank lots of water and rested. My mom and I went over to Molokai Friday night on the Ferry to Kaunakakai. Then headed over to the west side and stayed at the condos right where the event was. I slept in on Saturday and then went for a swim – I basically had a super relaxing day. Around 5:00 the race meeting started and then I had a huge dinner and went back to the room – and went right to bed to get a good night sleep. When I woke up I had oatmeal and put on my headphones and blasted some music to get pumped up. We had the blessing at 6:30am and then it was hurry up and get all the gear to the boat and get out to the start line. The lay down paddlers went first at 7:30am and now my heart is racing. I paddled over to the start line and I knew what I had to do. We started at 8:00am and we were off to a fast pace. The conditions were super good – the winds were up and there were good swells. In the beginning, it was more flat water so the stronger guys with muscles took off. But once we got into the swells I started to catch up to Livio Menelau and Ekolu Kalama. Dave Kalama and Scott Gamble went south so I did not see much of them. I finally caught and passed Livio, but I just could not catch up to Ekolu. So I put my head down and paddled my hardest. When I looked up about 45 min later I had closed the gap and was right behide Ekolu but once he notice I was right by him he turned on his after burners and just took off. So now I was in 2nd place so I just kept paddling. When I looked over to my left (south), I noticed another SUP paddler and it was Scott Gamble. He was coming from the south and I was now trying to pick up my pace to stay up with him. He was super far to the south so I thought I still had a chance, but his course was a lot better and he pulled into 2nd and put me in third. When I finally rounded the outside point to come into the harbor, my jaw drop to the board because the wind was blowing about 10 knots offshore and I had to paddle 2 more miles into it. It’s like running a 32 mile marathon and putting the last 2 miles up a steep hill. When I finally crossed the finish line and got into shore, I was so happy because I made it and got third place. BUT, then someone told me that Dave Kalama was already in and he got 1st place, not Ekolu. Dave was so far in front that I did not even see him (I don’t think anyone did!!). So at the end I got 4th overall for Solo Stand Up paddling and I got 7th overall out of all the lay down paddlers and SUP paddlers, both team and solo. So I am super stoked on my results and hope to do better next time.

My Finish Time 5:12:43.
1st Place SOLO SUP Men’s 29 and under
4th Place Overall SOLO SUP
7th Place Overall SUP, Paddleboards, Solo and Team – out of 139 Entries

SUP Results:
1st = Dave Kalama 4:54:15
2nd = Ekolu Kalama 5:03:13
3rd = Scott Gamble 5:06:15
4th = Connor Baxter 5:12:43

I want to thank all my sponsors for their help and support – Starboard, Nike 6.0, SIC, Dakine, Sunrite Maui, Waterman’s Sunscreen, and Ion Wetsuits. Also, my newest sponsors Kaenon Sunglasses and EFX Performance USA!!!

Also, a BIG Mahalo to Mark Raaphorst, Livio Menelau, Scott Trudon, Bart de Schwart for all the time and support they have devoted to training with me!!!!!!!!! Also, Scott Sanchez (MPG) for his wisdom on fitness and training!!

Aloha –
Connor Baxter

Photos: Karen Baxter

Molokai 2010 results: Jamie Mitchell Wins 9th Molokai to Oahu Paddle Race

Sunday, July 25th, 2010

The unofficial news is that Jamie Mitchell has won his 9th Molokai to Oahu World Championship Paddleboard Race..we’ll keep you posted!

Result Updates:

First Place: Jamie Mitchell 4:52:45 UNLIMITED PADDLEBOARD

Second Place: Dave Kalama  4:54:15 SUP UNLIMITED

Third Place: Ekolu Kalama  5:03:13 SUP UNLIMITED

Fourth Place: Scott Gamble 5:06:15 SUP UNLIMITED

Fifth Place: Jackson English 5:07:54 UNLIMITED PADDLEBOARD

Full unofficial results

PaddleAthletes.com own Brian Szymanski’s Team NCP and Pete Stirling killed it ..great job guys!!

Australian Jamie Mitchell, 33, claimed an unprecedented ninth Molokai-2-Oahu World Paddleboard title in Hawaii today, completing the 32-mile distance just four minutes outside of his own record in a time of 4 hours, 52 minutes and 45 seconds. His record of 4:48:23, set in 2007, stands for another year. Mitchell attributed today’s convincing win to experience in Hawaiian waters that allowed him to overcome an uncooperative ocean of disorganized  swells. And if Mitchell is the ‘King of Paddleboard’, then Hawaii’s Kanesa Duncan-Seraphin, 34, is the ‘Queen’, claiming her 8th Molokai-2-Oahu title in a time of 6:02:45 – less than 10 minutes shy of the record she set in 2004.

In the men’s division, it was 1-2-3 for Australia with Jackson English, (5:07:54) in second, and Joel Mason (5:15:42) in third. Fourth-placed Mikey Cote was the top placing Hawaii paddler (5:15:42). Beyond the finish line, Mitchell and English were paddling today to raise funds for SurfAid International. Their impressive 1-2 finish will likely see them surpass their $10,000 target.

“You had to really work for everything you got out there,” said Mitchell. “The wind seemed a little more out of the north, meaning a lot of of disorganization out there so you had to really work through the bumps.

“There was no real current, but the wind and the swell just made it hard. It was definitely not the hardest one I’ve done, but it wasn’t the best one, either, maybe 6 out of 10.”

Duncan-Seraphin was perhaps a little more forgiving: “It was  a fairly fast course, but it was technical. The bumps were very close together and you really had to stay focused. I love this race and this was my 10th (year doing it). I’m just stoked to finish. I felt like I had a great race today. This was one of my top 3 performances.”

Victory in the stand-up paddle (SUP) men’s and women’s divisions went to Maui’s Dave Kalama (4:54:15) and Andrea Moller (6:00:00), both setting records for their  respective divisions. Stand-up paddlers can be faster across the channel than the traditional paddleboarders, as standing upright with the wind at your back, and using a paddle can be of assistance. Kalama was roughly two minutes behind Mitchell, and Moller was two minutes faster than Duncan-Seraphin. Today’s rough surface conditions were a particular test of balance for the SUP contestants.

“There are a lots of really good sprinters, but I’m not one of them, so the windy races are what I train for and that’s what I’m built for,” said Kalama. “I’m really happy I won. Last year was really frustrating and to comeback and win it means everything.”

Renowned as one of the most treacherous bodies of water in the world, the Molokai Channel upheld its reputation today dishing out either high times or heartbreak. One hundred and fifty paddlers started out today, eight did not officially finish. Among the eight were 2009 runner-up Brian Rocheleau (Hawaii), who was forced to withdraw part-way through the race due to severe illness. Mark Matheson (Hawaii), the only paraplegic to ever undertake the famous Molokai Channel crossing, found himself on a sure course to finish today, but lost his mandatory escort boat to engine failure with 10 miles remaining and was forced to call it a day. Kauai’s Ann Hettinger, 52 and the oldest woman to SUP solo across the channel, had to withdraw after 11 miles when the steering rudder on her paddleboard failed.

But like every channel swell, every trough has a peak, and it was high times for many paddlers who accomplished personal bests today. Among them were 12-year-old Riggs Napoleon (Hawaii, 7:10:30), the youngest person to ever cross the Molokai channel on any unmotorized watercraft; and Jeff Denholm (California, 7:49:10), an inspirational athlete who designs his own prosthetics and then puts them to the ultimate stress tests in a variety of sports. Denholm, 43, lost an arm to an accident on a fishing boat off the coast of Alaska more than a decade ago, but never allowed it to undermine his athletically driven lifestyle. He crossed the Molokai Channel last year in spite of his prosthetic glue giving out on him. Today he posted a personal best of 7:49:10 and vowed to return even faster in 2011.

“I jumped up to an 18-footer today and I wrestled it the whole way and had a hard time, but the arm was a bomber!” said Denholm. “So just one more piece of the puzzle: if I can figure out a board that matches what I can do then I’ll be faster. It was humbling as usual. My arm worked great, the crew was strong, but I just got on a board that I couldn’t handle. I was paddling sideways the whole time.  I was more sideways then I was straight! But I’ll be back.”