Posts Tagged ‘SUP surfing’

[SUP] Abu Dhabi All Star Surf Final Day 2014

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

[SUP] USSUP Huntington Beach Final 2014

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

[SUP] SUP Surfers in India

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Those are the 2 faces of India: One is of flat water canals surrounded by temples and Hindu culture, the other one is about crystal clear empty barrels peeling in off limit islands under the Muezzin voice.

Carine Camboulives & Manu Bouvet together with their 2 daughters Lou and Shadé pursue their quest for adventure and discovery in the southern region of Kerala. Their SUP boards are the ultimate tool to open up to the world and enjoy a beautiful, yet fragile environment.

[SUP] Kai Lenny’s Massive Barrel at Jaws on a SUP

Sunday, March 9th, 2014

Kai Lenny gives a play by play on his massive Jaws barrel. Shots by Matty Shweitzer and Pure Digital Maui

SUP Surf Maui Boy Bernd Roediger Finding Magic in the Solomons

Saturday, February 15th, 2014

The Maui windsurfer and SUP ripper Bernd Roediger finding some real barrels in the Solomon Island.

Stand Up World Tour – Turtle Bay Event Day 1

Saturday, February 8th, 2014

This is the full stream of the Stand Up World Tour event at Turtle Bay for 2014. Women and Kids!

Leco Salazar looking to defend his Title

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Current World Champion Leco Salazar looking to defend his Title in Huntington Beach.

HOME:

Santos, San Paulo, Brazil

SPONSORS:

New Advanced Surfboards
ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

• 2012 Standup World Tour-World Champion
• 2013 Standup World Tour, Ubatuba Pro, 1st Place
• 2012 Standup World Tour, Location X Virgin Islands, 1st Place
• 2011 Standup World Tour, Maresias, Brazil, 1st Place

QUOTE:

“I love sup, because besides making me physically and psychologically fit, it also serves as a way to relax. Seeing wonderful places all over the world, participating in the world tour, the sport of standup has changed my life. I’m very grateful and hope the sport just keeps growing.”

Big SUP Session with the Bertish Brothers

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

Big messy day on the West Coast of South Africa – Chris and Greg Bertish tackle sizey surf on their big wave SUP guns. Onshore winds and mangled seas filmed into the afternoon sunlight makes for silvery black and white effect – enjoy! PS: Chris is on his forehand while Greg is on his backhand.

Manutea MONNIER Tahiti SUP Surf!

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Manutea MONNIER is one of the best SUP surfers from Tahiti. He demonstrates in this video at a freeride session on one of the biggest right of the island where few venture SUPer.

Because pictures are worth a thousand words, I do not make you wait any longer. Load the video, turn it up and open your eyes. THIS IS THE HEAVY!

Source:

http://www.ridingsup.com/insane-maraa/

Keahi de Aboitiz SUP surfing

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Ripper Keahi de Aboitiz, the reigning Kite Surfing World Champion surfing Queensland

Punta Sayulita SUP Classic 2013

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

Featuring Starboard riders Sean Poynter, Zane Schweitzer, Vanina Walsh and Giorgio Gomez

North Shore Outer Reef on a SUP

Thursday, February 14th, 2013

First big swell of the winter on the North Shore – this is going to be an epic winter. Windsurfer and SUP charger Michi Schweiger!

Sunset Beach Pro 2013 Day 1 Main Event

Sunday, February 10th, 2013

It was a magical day at Sunset Beach today, with a picture perfect Hawaiian day accompanied by giant but managable surf in the 12ft+ range (20ft plus faces). The perfect setting saw some spectacular action that took us all the way through the trials and through 6 heats of the 1st round in the Main Event. With mindblowing conditions and action to match, Sunset Beach once again legitimized itself as the ultimate opener for the Stand Up World Tour.

How To Ride Waves On a SUP

Wednesday, January 16th, 2013

Scott Mckercher show you basic wave riding techniques for SUP Surfing

Tasmanian Macking Left Paddle Surf Sesh

Monday, January 14th, 2013

SUP chargers Kyron Rathbone and surfers Zeb Critchlow, Ty Hollmer-Cross, Andy Schwartz, Marti Paradisis, Danny O’ Donnel, Zak Grey, Ian Chalmers and James Hollmer-Cross on one of Tasmania’s rare gems.

2012 Sunset Beach Pro SUP surf trials

Thursday, February 9th, 2012

The media did a great job to capture the athletes perspective after each heat; made for some great commentary.
Sunset Beach Pro SUP Surf World Tour Trials
It was a solid day of rising swell 6′-8′ swell with a bunch of 10′-12′ ft clean up sets.
Went out at sunrise to get a couple good warm up waves and get the conditions dialed.
I got a couple great waves and my Naish Hokua 9’8 was feeling great for the size.
Some of the sets were so big; the only thing the crowd would see is the track from the rider as they glided down the face.
Sure enough when you get a little comfortable, thats when it happens; Kai Lenny and I were paddling for this one steep bomb that I
didn’t want to let go by and getting into it a little late, I air dropped down the face, landed and set up for the bottom turn just as the lip went over my head and shut the garage door, sending me deep to the bottom, rag dolling for several seconds trying to figure out which way was up and finally I climbed my leash rope to the surface for air.
I came up laughing and collected my gear and paddled back out to get a couple more just to keep my head in the game.
I competed in 3,  20 minute heats against a strong competitive field of athletes from all over the world.
I went into each heat with one thing in mind; to have as much fun as surfing and hitting the lip in the most critical place possible and it worked.
Setting up on the inside bowl for a couple sharp turns and just staying busy was the ultimate goal.
Its all about the delivery on setting up for the grand finally.
I really love to go for it and finish the wave by hitting the closeout section…..
I can’t say I wasn’t nervous or full of adrenaline, but going against the best always brings out the best in you.
In The last heat, the swell was getting pretty maxed out with a couple close out sets and the wind and rain turned onshore making it pretty difficult, where any mistake could take you out of the game.
The inside section really set up nicely for a couple fast hard turns…
Sunset Beach Pro 2012 – Trails.mov
 
 
I concentrated on getting the biggest waves and if nothing came my way, I just stayed busy on the inside which ended up working in my favor.
It’s funny how sometimes you really feel like you didn’t surf to the best of your ability and you come in after your heat thinking you lost and you end
up winning.
Thats a great humbling reminder to never give up and to always remember that everyone in your heat deals with their own set of challenges where you
never know what can happen. That always makes for a pleasant surprise… LOL
Now I made it into the first round of the main event, I really look forward to doing it all over again.
Super stoked and I’m hoping for huge surf to separate the men from the boys.
Thanks to all my sponsors for your great support and in helping me do what I love to do.
Aloha,
Chuck P
chuckpattersonsports.com
 

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Insights about “Me my Shark and I” – White Shark Revisited by Chuck Patterson

Monday, October 4th, 2010

GoPro Hero Great White Shark video Chuck patterson

Buy GoPro HERO Camera at GoPro.com

What lurks below every day

I have been stand up paddling for the last 5 years traveling the world chasing waves, paddling long distance ocean channels and coastlines and racing. The sport of stand up paddling gives you such a great view of marine life as you stand on top of your board paddling through the oceans and lakes. I think that is one of the most intriguing beauties that makes stand up paddling so inviting. “You are your own captain of your ship, exploring the waters of the world”.

Ever since I have been stand up paddling, I have witnessed some unbelievable moments of mother Natures creations paddling in the ocean. I have had a Blue whale breech in front of me, startled a huge Marlin sunning itself on the surface, paddled along side dolphins, Grey whales, Whale sharks, Thresher and Mako sharks and in the last 2 years several Great White encounters.

For someone who rarely paddles in the ocean; this could be pretty scary, but for someone like me who spends almost every day in it, It is magic.

San Onofre beach has been known for hundreds of shark sightings; in my opinion because of the Power plant that sits just South of the beach park that uses the salt water for cooling and the warm water that flows back in attracts big numbers of fish and marine life and this coastline has been a known breeding ground for several sharks for over a hundred years.

For the last couple of years paddling that stretch of beach, many oStand up paddle surfing at San Of us have had Mako, Thresher and Great White sharks swim under and around us while SUP surfing in the line up. The sharks have always been there; it’s just until now because we are standing up on our boards paddling, that we have a better view of what lurks below. Most of the sharks we have seen vary from 6′ to around 10′ in length with a couple rare sightings of 12′ and bigger. With a huge abundance of fish, these sharks are fed well and have only been curious of what else shares their waters.

It’s become a normal occurrence where someone has seen a shark just about every other day. The more you see them, the more comfortable you get which in turn can be a mistake, being that these kings of the sea are still very wild and unpredictable. In the past 2 years I have had some very long encounters where I have had a shark swim around me off and on for a couple hours. I would paddle around chasing down waves and like a puppy dog, it would be waiting for me just outside the surf zone. Kind of creepy, but it has always captured my own curiosity as well. It’s like being in Africa and stumbling across a lion or tiger in the bush or even fishing in Alaska and seeing a grizzly bear catching fish in the same river your fishing in.

I have always wanted to take a photo of these sharks that swim along side us, but every time I took my water camera with me, I would never see one. Then finally, after SUP surfing with a couple good friends one afternoon where we had a 7′-8′ shark circle us off and on for a half hour, I was determined to get a photo the next day. I rigged up an extension pole with one of the new GoPro HD HERO water proof cameras and paddled out on my 12’6 Hobie SUP race board to the same spot we saw the shark the day before and within 5 minutes there he was.

Pretty unbelievable to see in person.

GoPro Hero Great White Shark in the USAIt was a little freaky because I was looking forward and as I was scanning the horizon I accidentally startled the shark which was just behind me and as it took off, it’s tail hit my board bringing me to my knees to keep myself from falling in the water. After a moment of confusion and clarity; I stood up and set up my camera rig to take photos. A couple minutes passed and shark was no where to be seen. I had blown my only opportunity to capture a rare moment and then he appeared about 4o feet off the nose of my board. I’m not quite sure if this was the same shark or a smaller one. He made a couple wide passes and then came pretty close to where I could follow him swimming past with the pole cam. I shot a couple shots and then changed the setting to Video mode and was lucky to capture a couple really cool clips of  him circling before taking off. I paddled around searching for him and caught a couple more waves and paddled in.

Finally, I had some photos and video that I could study and share with friends. When I got home that night, my wife and I went over the photos and video and were blown away at what we saw. It was a 7′-8′ juvenile Great White shark that looked pretty Gurthy around his mid section. Totally stoked on my find, I put my video on Vimeo and posted it along with a couple photos on my Face Book to share with my friends. To my surprise; the next morning I was bombarded by phone calls and emails about the video.

I had no idea that this was so out of the ordinary because we see these sharks almost every day. I was completely  shocked at the mayhem that ensued shortly after. The shark video went viral world wide and by the next day had over 1.2 million views. I was contacted by several Shark specialists and marine biologists along with the whole alphabet of world wide news like CNN, CBS, NBC, ABC, FOX, you name it. View it here

Long story short it has been a major learning experience for me with a lot of good and also some frustration. While most of the world seemed totally shark crazed and happy there were the few who didn’t approve. My mother and sister was one of them who made me realize that yes I was very lucky to come away from that experience alive and that perusing the shark is not a good idea. I also got an ear full from the local surf schools that were losing business because the parents saw the video and did not want to send their kids back in the water. I totally understand their frustration but can’t take the blame for filming something that has been going on for over 50 years. It’s basically what I call ” out of sight, out of mind mentality “. The video went world wide because everyone shared it and it turned into a whole new animal.

That being said, I have learned a great deal on how precious life is, our curiosity can, down the line get us into trouble, with every action there is a reaction, listen to your elders, and if your passionate about nature and life itself; be grateful and share it with everyone.

Words of wisdom – I was lucky and the next person may not be. Leave the shark exploring to the experts and divers of the world and Shark Week. Respect and protect nature and it’s surroundings from a safe distance and keep the ocean and our world clean.

Thanks for listening to another one of my eye opening adventures.

Buy GoPro HERO Camera at GoPro.com

[vimeo]http://vimeo.com/14054518[/vimeo]

Insight about “Me my Shark and I”

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

What lurks below every day
I have been stand up paddling for the last 5 years traveling the world chasing waves, paddling long distance ocean channels and coastlines and racing. The sport of stand up paddling gives you such a great view of marine life as you stand on top of your board paddling through the oceans and lakes. I think that is one of the most intriguing beauties that makes stand up paddling so inviting. “You are your own captain of your ship, exploring the waters of the world”.
Ever since I have been stand up paddling, I have witnessed some unbelievable moments of mother Natures creations paddling in the ocean. I have had a Blue whale breech in front of me, startled a huge Marlin sunning itself on the surface, paddled along side dolphins, Grey whales, Whale sharks, Thresher and Mako sharks and in the last 2 years several Great White encounters.
For someone who rarely paddles in the ocean; this could be pretty scary, but for someone like me who spends almost every day in it, It is magic.
San Onofre beach has been known for hundreds of shark sightings; in my opinion because of the Power plant that sits just South of the beach park that uses the salt water for cooling and the warm water that flows back in attracts big numbers of fish and marine life and this coastline has been a known breeding ground for several sharks for over a hundred years.
Stand up paddle surfing at San O
For the last couple of years paddling that stretch of beach, many of us have had Mako, Thresher and Great White sharks swim under and around us while SUP surfing in the line up. The sharks have always been there; it’s just until now because we are standing up on our boards paddling, that we have a better view of what lurks below. Most of the sharks we have seen vary from 6′ to around 10′ in length with a couple rare sightings of 12′ and bigger. With a huge abundance of fish, these sharks are fed well and have only been curious of what else shares their waters.
It’s become a normal occurrence where someone has seen a shark just about every other day. The more you see them, the more comfortable you get which in turn can be a mistake, being that these kings of the sea are still very wild and unpredictable. In the past 2 years I have had some very long encounters where I have had a shark swim around me off and on for a couple hours. I would paddle around chasing down waves and like a puppy dog, it would be waiting for me just outside the surf zone. Kind of creepy, but it has always captured my own curiosity as well. It’s like being in Africa and stumbling across a lion or tiger in the bush or even fishing in Alaska and seeing a grizzly bear catching fish in the same river your fishing in.
I have always wanted to take a photo of these sharks that swim along side us, but every time I took my water camera with me, I would never see one. Then finally, after SUP surfing with a couple good friends one afternoon where we had a 7′-8′ shark circle us off and on for a half hour, I was determined to get a photo the next day. I rigged up an extension pole with one of the new GoPro HD HERO water proof cameras and paddled out on my 12’6 Hobie SUP race board to the same spot we saw the shark the day before and within 5 minutes there he was.
Pretty unbelievable to see in person.
It was a little freaky because I was looking forward and as I was scanning the horizon I accidentally startled the shark which was just behind me and as it took off, it’s tail hit my board bringing me to my knees to keep myself from falling in the water. After a moment of confusion and clarity; I stood up and set up my camera rig to take photos. A couple minutes passed and shark was no where to be seen. I had blown my only opportunity to capture a rare moment and then he appeared about 4o feet off the nose of my board. I’m not quite sure if this was the same shark or a smaller one. He made a couple wide passes and then came pretty close to where I could follow him swimming past with the pole cam. I shot a couple shots and then changed the setting to Video mode and was lucky to capture a couple really cool clips of  him circling before taking off. I paddled around searching for him and caught a couple more waves and paddled in.

Finally, I had some photos and video that I could study and share with friends. When I got home that night, my wife and I went over the photos and video and were blown away at what we saw. It was a 7′-8′ juvenile Great White shark that looked pretty Gurthy around his mid section. Totally stoked on my find, I put my video on Vimeo and posted it along with a couple photos on my Face Book to share with my friends. To my surprise; the next morning I was bombarded by phone calls and emails about the video.
I had no idea that this was so out of the ordinary because we see these sharks almost every day. I was completely  shocked at the mayhem that ensued shortly after. The shark video went viral world wide and by the next day had over 1.2 million views. I was contacted by several Shark specialists and marine biologists along with the whole alphabet of world wide news like CNN, CBS, NBC, ABC, FOX, you name it.

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/08/13/earlyshow/living/petplanet/main6769557.shtml?tag=cbsnewsTwoColUpperPromoArea

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Surftech SUP surf Shootout at Steamer Lane

Monday, April 5th, 2010

Solid swell for the Surftech SUP surf Shoot Out at Steamer Lane.
Last year I competed in the SUP surf event which was part of the Kayak Surf Festival in Santa Cruz at Steamer Lane and the waves were knee to waist high, making it very challenging to really showcase the sport of SUP surfing. This year’s event had a solid swell forecasted to hit during the event and build on the final day.
I had spent the last couple weeks training for the Catalina Crossing SUP race where I was going to team up with Byron Kurt and paddle our new Hobie  Unlimited board, but after looking at the forecast I made some last minute arrangements because I really wanted to get the chance to SUP surf Steamer Lane with some solid size and really give a good showing for the sport.
I drove up early Thursday morning and arrived in Santa Cruz at 6 am and took a short 3 hour nap. Restless, I ate some breakfast and picked up some new race and SUP surf fins from The Rainbow Fin company which has been my sponsor since the early 90′s. I always love going in there and talking shop and seeing what new creations Schad has designed for me for SUP, tow surfing and kiteboarding.
Shortly after, I drive up to the event site at Steamer Lane to test out a couple of my new short Hobie SUP surfboards and make sure I have everything dialed before contest time the next day. The waves were double over head on the sets with a spread out crowd, making it easy to catch a couple waves and get warmed up. Later that evening I drove back to the Broome’s house where I was staying and enjoyed a nice home cooked meal, hot shower and passed out within seconds of hitting the bed.
I woke up super early and drove up to the event site to secure a parking spot and see what the swell was doing before my heat. The swell was still holding double over head, but there was a slight bump in the water from the high tide and the waves refracting off the cliff walls. I wanted to ride my Hobie 8’8 but decided at the last minute to ride my 9’9 mini gun, for stability and the ease for catching waves. We had to wear helmets because of liability reasons, which took a little getting used to because of the muffling sound on the ears and if you fell and had to punch through a wave, your head felt like it would just float off your shoulders.
Early morning light with the first SUP surf heat in the water.
We had 20 minutes with 5 guys in a heat, so it was important to get a good solid opening ride to set the pace and then keep building on that as fast as you could. The waves were pretty perfect and every now and then you could catch one that would have a South bend to it that would race all the way around the corner for over 100 yards through to the inside. At the blink of an eye the heat was over and you always wished you had one more wave, but when its almost perfect you just have to go with the flow.
My first day of competition and the waves were perfect. photo Jarrett McPeek
The first round of the SUP division was over for the day, so I drove up the coast with good friend Peter Trow and met up with photographer Jarrett McPeek to take advantage of the swell and get some shooting in. We found a nice Right hand point break that had a couple big set waves rolling all the way to the inside with no one out. We suited up and paddled up to the top of the point to see what we could find. The swell was a little raw and unorganized, making it slightly challenging to connect one all the way to the inside. Peter and I traded a couple fun waves along with several close outs which made for some fun paddling. A couple hours later the wind started to work its way down the coast, so we called it a day and got some lunch.
exploring another fun Northern California point break. photo Jarrett McPeek
the waves were pretty challenging this day, but every now and then you would get a god one. photo Jarrett McPeek
After a small nap, I met up with Dave Broome and a couple of my good friends who own and run Caution kites out of Santa Cruz and went up the coast for a kiteboarding session. The wind was blowing a steady 20-25 mph with good waves and a pretty big crowd: but when your kiting with the local boys, the crowd seems to always disappear. I have to admit that my kiteboarding was a little rusty, but after an hour of battling the crowd in the waves, it slowly came back. I always love changing it up on the water, no matter what the conditions are.
Santa Cruz always caters to everything a waterman wants to do. Kiteboarding North of Santa cruz with the Caution boys.
After a full day of nonstop adventure, I went to a BRBQ at one of Dave’s friends house up in the Santa Cruz mountains where they had built an insane mini moto dirt bike track in the front yard. It was pretty awesome to watch the boys terrorize each other as they raced around the track and every couple laps one of them would come flying off the track just short of taking themselves out. Dave let me try out his new 110 around the track. It has been a long, long time since I last rode a dirt bike and after a couple laps, I was hooked. That’s all I need, is another sport to escort me to the hospital even quicker. ha ha. Much respect, I will stick to the water for now…..
Like a kid in a candy store…..
The next day our heats started mid morning with a slight drop in swell, but great conditions. I rode my Hobie 8’8 Stinger swallow tail quad which worked insane for driving down the line with speed and doing quick round house snaps in the pocket. Riding this board makes me feel like I’m surfing my short board. I worked my way through that heat, just milking every wave to the inside with as many tight turns as possible. Everyone was surfing really well, which made for some stiff competition.
The swell started pumping just in time for the finals.
The next day, they ran the semi finals and then the finals. I was super stoked I made it to the finals. The swell started building and just before our final heat, sets were hitting the outside middle peak with 10′-12′ ft faces pealing perfectly through Indicators. The tide was on it’s way up, making it great conditions for a good final. Everyone was surfing out their heads and with only 20 minutes, every second counted. After each wave, I would kick out and paddle as fast as I could back to the top of the point. The waves would peal so long that you had to force yourself to kick out. It was really tough to tell who was going to take it because everybody kept getting really good waves. The horn sounded and the heat was over. We all congratulated each other with big smiles on our faces. Sharing waves with 3 guys at the Lane was pretty sweet.
The competition was solid and everyone was ripping. Thanks Surftech for a great event.
I was very fortunate that all my hard work paid off and I was able to defend my title one more time. Congrats to Zane Schweitzer 2nd, Michael Roberts 3rd and to Peter Trow 4th for really pushing the level of competition in the event. It was really great to see guys like Zane Schweitzer, Sean Pointer, and Dan Gavere pushing the short board style to the next level. Everyone has such a unique style and it will be exciting to see where the sport is next year.
I want to thank Surftech for another great event at the Lane and to all the competitors for pushing the sport. I want to thank Dave and Sarah Broome and Rainbow Fins for a great weekend in Santa Cruz and a huge Thank you to all my sponsors Hobie, Ocean Minded, kialoa paddles, Dakine, Rainbow fins, O’neill wetsuits, Reactor watches, Watermans sunscreen, H2o Audio, OnIt extreme cream, Monster paint traction and my family for your support in making this trip possible.
Photos by Jarrett McPeek

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Makaha Ku IKaika big wave West side Adventure

Saturday, March 13th, 2010

Shortly after coming home from my family ski trip up in Lake Tahoe; I received  a message that the Kui Kaika big wave SUP surf event at Makaha was going to run that following Monday. It was Saturday morning and I had to still book a last minute ticket, pack boards, make some calls to friends on the West side about a place to stay and above all, make sure my wife was ok with me pulling another  disappearing act for another 3 day adventure. Sure enough I got the green light and everything fell into place by that night.

Up at 3 am Sunday morning, quick breakfast shake, hugged my dog, kissed my wife and out the door to the airport like Casper the ghost. I parked at long term parking, unloaded my SUP boards and crossed my fingers that the shuttle guy wouldn’t have a heart attack at the sight of my oversized board bag. The funny thing was, that the board bag wouldn’t fit into the shuttle door. I couldn’t help to laugh, but then got kind of nervous. How the heck am I getting this monstrosity to the airport?? Only a mile a way; I could run with it over my shoulders?? Just then the driver says, “no worries, I will open the back window”. That was pretty lucky… Next stop, playing Russian roulette with the ticket counter attendant with my oversized board bag. Lucky again; I just lifted it up like it weighed 20 lbs and nearly blew my shoulder out.. ha ha.

Travel now a days is totally different. I can remember way back traveling with all my windsurf gear to Hawaii etc. with a 10 ft windsurf board bag that carried 3 wave boards and a surfboard then another huge gear bag filled with masts, booms and sails etc. both bags weighing well over 100 lbs to where you could only drag them on the floor and only having to pay $125 for both. Now a days, you have to cross your fingers in hopes of getting a nice ticket agent that doesn’t give you the run around about opening your bag and counting boards etc. I have been lucky more times then not and found that a super big smile accompanied by the yes sir, yes ma’am attitude works pretty well.

coming into Oahu. nothing like getting back to the tropics and warm water.

A quick 5 hour flight and I arrive on Oahu, grab my boards and call my good friend Craig Davidson who is a Lifeguard on the West side as well as a stuntman, waterman and one of the most humblest guys I have ever met. We drive back to the West side towards Makaha and I was shocked to see how small it was. The forecast was calling for a solid 15 ft NorthWest swell to start filling in by the evening. As we passed Makaha, the waves were only 2-3 ft; kind of hard to believe that by this time tomorrow the swell would be pumping, but that’s what Hawaii is known for. I quickly got settled in at the Davidson property, met the family, had a bite to eat and set up my boards.  Craig and his daughter walked me across the street, down a path to the ocean where he showed me a couple spots in the sharp volcanic reef to dive in with my SUP board and paddle down to the point at Makaha. I watched the waves for a while and decided it was too small to SUP, so I just paddle surfed on one of his short boards till dark. By the end of my session, you could see a couple pulses of the new swell starting to show. I was pretty burnt out from traveling, so shortly after dinner it was lights out for me.

My 8’8 stinger swallow tail quad nad my 9’9 double bump swallow thruster by Hobie

Craig and I woke early the next morning and checked the surf in front of his house. There was definite swell, but still on the small side with a couple good sized sets a little on the inconsistent side. We drove down to the beach and met up with some of the local Makaha boys and competitors to see what the call was going to be about running the event. It was great to see everyone; kind of a who’s who of the Hawaiian water world, like Brian Kealana, Mel Puu, Archie Kalepa and Robby Naish to name a few.

Early morning lines at the top of the point.

The swell had turned a little North which made it look as if the swell was slightly missing the point with sets toping out at 8-10 ft, still not big enough to give the green light for the event. Glen Mancata of Quiksilver  had to make a tough decision and after talking with several of the guys at C4, they all decided that the swell was too small and wait till next year. It was an unfortunate call, but what can you do?? I watched a couple solid sets roll through the point with strong off shore winds and only 3 guys out. I was pretty fired up to say the least, so we ran back to the house and got ready for a long day on the water.  Sun screen and a full belly, ready to rock!! I walked across the street and made my way up the reef to study the conditions and look for a safe way out. It was pretty intense to watch the sets march in way up the coast and with in a minute or so it would just light up in front of the reef making it impossible to even think of paddling out. I must have run out to the jump off spot on the reef and back at least 10 times because the sets kept coming.

Timing the sets, and running back and forth through the sea urchin filled reef made for a great adventure.

Finally, a break in the action and I tip toed across the jagged reef for my last time and plunged into the deep blue paddling for the horizon like an olympic swimmer. Safely outside the impact zone, I paddled down to the top of the point and waited for a set. There were only 3 of us at the top of the point and a handful of guys surfing the West bowl. Looking up the coast, I could see another big set starting to hit the reefs on the way down so I paddled out about 20 yards and waited. Sure enough the dark liquid mountains formed perfectly just outside of me. Rule number one; never take the first wave of a set with a building swell because the next couple waves are always bigger. I stroke over the first 2 waves and quickly spin around and aim for the West bowl. As I paddle into the wave, my board speed increases and I start to glide down the face, pumping past every section with more and more speed. The wave starts to bend hitting the West bowl section and I attempt to rebound off the lip, turning back going left and get completely swallowed and driven to the bottom. Still griping my paddle, I get pulled like a torpedo towards the beach and finally break the surface gasping for air. i take 2 more waves on the head and paddle on my stomach towards the safety of the channel. What a rush! what a wave! back out for another I go.

running the section.

Within the hour, the swell really starts to pulse and fill in with a couple solid 12 footers and bigger. Paddling back out was as good as riding the wave because you could watch all your friends take off deep racing for the channel and sometimes fighting the close out with some great wipe outs. It couldn’t be more perfect; light off shores, hot and sunny with a building swell and only a handful of the best to share the day. Every hour, there was a changing of the guard and a new crew of guys would shuffle into the line up. Later Aaron Napolean joined me at the point and pulled into a bunch of insane close outs with the biggest smile on his face. By mid day he and I had the line up to ourselves for an hour just trading wave after wave. The water patrol sat in the channel on their ski all day, making rescues and pulling us out of the pit every time one of us would got hammered by the end bowl. Later the off shore winds really kicked in heavy making it almost impossible to drop into the wave. One of my worst wipe outs of the day was when I paddled into a solid set wave and just as I was making the drop, the wind picked up the board and hung me on the lip, flipping me side ways, free falling, backwards into the pit. I can remember floating for the longest time wondering when I was going to hit and explode. I wore 3 more on the head and got plucked out of the soup by the guys on the ski, who applauded my crazy effort in flight.

By 3, the wind had increase dramatically and my beaten body was running on empty. I caught the next wave in and ran back to the house to refuel. it’s amazing how long your hungry body will hold out when the waves are good. After a little nap and a huge lunch, I joined Aaron Napolean and the boys at the beach for a beer and listened to Mel Puu and Ekolu play their ukuleles. I wanted to go back out for another evening session, but after 6 hours of good waves and beatings I was pretty content to just sit and chill. That night Craig’s wife cooked a great dinner and then I slowly melted into the pillows for a long, uninterrupted sleep.

afternoon on the beach after a great day of surf.

Hanging with the boys enjoying some good Hawaiian music

The next day the swell had dropped, but still pushed a couple solid sized sets through the morning. I decided to try my new 8’8 Hobie stinger, swallow tail quad and see how it worked with a little of the leftover Hawaiian juice. I got a couple really fun waves off the point that connected with the West bowl and reformed into a really fast racy left. The board really worked well, making super tight turns and rebounding off the section with ease. As the swell slowly faded, we all camped on the middle peak connecting long rides all the way to the beach.

my 8’8 Hobie

A view from the point looking in

After another great 4 hour session, I joined Sam Pai and his friend for some good Kalbi plate lunch and then a cool drive up the coast to the end of the road. It was great to get a first hand look at some of the hidden beauty and history on the West side. When traveling any where in the world, it’s really important to respect the locals, their way of life and the hidden beauty that makes it so special. “Respect, enjoy and leave it as you found it so that some day you can come back and do it all over again’.

One of the many caves on the way.

the ‘Moi hole’ where Brian Kealana, Craig Davidson and others rescued 2 swimmers in the cave years ago, showing the potential of what the jetski can do to save lives.

Lava coast line

I love this stuff

Later that afternoon, I packed up all my boards for my flight back home and enjoyed playing with the dog and watching Craig show is daughter the simple pleasures of flying a kite. I can remember back when I did that with my dad, it was the coolest thing ever.

“Pico” could go for hours chasing the ball.

Craig explaining the secret to flying kites, to his daughter.

It didn’t take long until she got the hang of it. Just to see her smile when the kite took off, was priceless.

This West side adventure was truly a special one; making new friends, enjoying great surf with some of the worlds best and exploring some of the hidden gems the West side has to offer. Many thanks to Craig and his wonderful family for sharing their paradise with me and to all the Makaha boys for all the great waves and friendship and to my wife and sponsors for your support in making these adventure possible.

Aloha to all and check back for many more adventures coming soon.

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