Posts Tagged ‘whitewater’

Kayak Film ” High” – Kenya Siberia

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

A kayaking film brought to you by British boaters featuring Kenya, Siberia (Russia), Northern Pakistan, Meghalaya (India) and the UK.

We have been raising money for a Pakistani women’s charity, the Women’s Association for Advancement (WAFA). Their aim is to improve the lives of women in Pakistan. To find out more about WAFA or to make a donation please go tokayakpakistan.co.uk/donate.html

Some Southeastern Stoutage

Sunday, May 12th, 2013

Hunt, Eliot, Kincaid, and Isaac running a southeastern waterfall after the past week’s big rain

Substantial Play Boating SUBSTANTIAL + AWESOME!

Wednesday, May 29th, 2013

Rarely will you find the Substantial Boys dabbling in the arts of “PLAY” boating…but there is a time, and in that time, there is a place, and in that place, there is a saying…HAPPY STAKEOUT! Enjoy some amazing wave surfing from some of the sports best (not including me)…The Ruins wave is one of the greats in big wave surfing…it’s like the feeling you get when you take a first sip of an ice cold beer after a long day of work

Whitewater Kayak Tasmania

Saturday, December 7th, 2013

A solid compilation of whitewater kayak action in all areas of Tasmania including Lake River, Nile River, Leven Canyon, Cataract, Upper St. Paul above Meadstone Falls, Swan River below Hardings Falls, and the Big Bend section of the N. Esk at 6ft+

Liam Fournier Highlights of the 2013 Whitewater Kayak Travel Diary

Sunday, December 8th, 2013

Trips to Chile, Nepal, America and the rivers of western Canada. Thanks to everyone who made my season so memorable. I am looking forward to next season, paddling new rivers, meeting new people and having a good ol time !!!

Lava Whitewater Run Grand Canyon

Friday, January 31st, 2014

[Whitewater Kayak] Heavy Water Big Waterfalls in New Zealand

Saturday, March 29th, 2014

Ben Brown and Rush Sturges going big on the huge waterfalls and some heavy river flows.

[Whitewater] ICF Wildwater Canoeing World Championships

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014

There are a number of lesser known paddle disciplines that I wanted to start showcasing, including Downriver sprint canoe and kayak or Wildwater C1 and K1. This video showcases the ICF Wildwater Canoeing World Championships 2012 in Aime Mâcot la Plagne and focuses on the rescues are required during the competition.

Also know as Wildwater to distinguish it from whitewater slalom or freestyle. Wikpedia describes the boats as “Wildwater kayaks and canoes are long (4.5 m/14 ft 9 in) and narrow (60 cm/23.6 in), with a rounded hull profile, making them fast but unstable and hard to turn. Wildwater solo canoes (C-1) are 4.3 m (14 ft 1 in) long and 70 cm (27.5 in) wide; 2-person whitewater canoes (C-2) are 5 m (16 ft 5 in) long and 80 cm (31.5 in) wide.[1] Rather than using wide sweep strokes to turn the boat, the paddler tilts the boat to one side, utilizing its curved profile to effect the turn in a manner similar to “carving a turn” in skiing. Two “wings” (flaring protrusions near the stern hull) meet the minimum width required by racing rules and add secondary stability, as well as enhancing the effect of carving a turn. When the boat is under way, most of each wing will be above the waterline so as to minimize drag. The use of kevlar, carbon fiber, and glass-reinforced plastic construction has substantially reduced the weight of wildwater boats, while improving stiffness.”

Here is a POV from the INTEGRALE CHALAUX Canoeing Classic which is the classic race for the European championships 2005 in wildwater kayaking. After in 2008 and 2013, the race was for the French Championships. The river is the mitical river in France.

Taylor Robertson and Dan Gavere Hit a 40ft+ Waterfall on a SUP

Sunday, May 4th, 2014

Taylor Robertson walks us through running waterfalls on a stand up paddleboard. This 40+ foot waterfall has never been attempted on a stand up whitewater Board, but has been successfully navigated multiple times in a kayak by both Taylor Robertson and Dan Gavere. Water levels have to be optimal and at high water this same drop can be extremely dangerous.